The SEC Removed ‘Acting’ From Sagar Teotia’s Job Title

Sagar Teotia is officially your new chief accountant at the SEC, a position he had held in an acting role since Wesley Bricker surprisingly announced he was stepping down as chief accountant in June.

Sagar Teotia

Teotia definitely has the chops for the chief accountant office. He had served as deputy chief accountant under Bricker since 2017 and served as a professional accounting fellow in the Office of the Chief Accountant from 2009 to 2011.

He also continues what former SEC chief accountant Lynn Turner once called the Big 4 “capture” of the office. Teotia joined the SEC in 2017 from Deloitte, where he was a partner in Deloitte’s national office and was responsible for providing consultation regarding accounting matters.

Teotia’s predecessor is also a former Big 4 accountant, as Bricker was partner responsible for audit engagements in the banking, capital markets, financial technology, and investment management sectors at PwC before joining the SEC in 2015.

I tried to look on the interwebs for anything interesting about Teotia, like he’s a career .283 hitter in 16-inch softball (after all, he worked at Deloitte in Chicago for a time), or he has a wine cellar stocked with vintage reds, or that he’s an avid bike rider, which my first thought then would be, “For the love of God, PLEASE BE CAREFUL, SAGAR!”

But I couldn’t find anything. He seems pretty straight-laced and good at his job, and as an accountant—I’m sorry, chief accountant—that’s OK.

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