your health

Sitting At Your Desk Is Killing You

Did you need more proof that your job sucks? How about this infographic:

According to the graphic, we now sit 9.3 hours a day, far more than the 7.7 hours we spend sleeping. Our hunter/gatherer bodies just weren’t built for this lifestyle.

Sitting for more than 6 hours a day makes you 40% more likely to die within 15 years versus someone who sits for fewer than 3 hours a day. Exercise does not offset this increased risk of premature death.

Those who sit in front of the TV for 3 hours or more a day are 64% more likely to die of heart disease.

So what can you do besides quitting your job to roam the fields for buffalo day in and day out? Try some of these busy season exercise tips from AccountingWEB for starters. My favorite is working at my desk while sitting on an exercise ball; it helps correct my posture and offers a core workout while I’m humming away at my laptop.

Enjoy!

Infographic courtesy Medical Billing and Coding

Area Accountant Breaks Up with Donut

The following post is republished from AccountingWEB, a source of accounting news, information, tips, tools, resources and insight — everything you need to help you prosper and enjoy the accounting profession.

Dear Donut,

Our relationship goes back a long way. I feel like you’ve become a big part of me. You used to be such a treat, but now, I fear you’ve become a bad habit. Three-thirty in the afternoon rolls around and suddenly you’re there, demanding my attention. It wasn’t supposed to be this way.

I don’t know how to say this without hurting your feelings, but let’s face it. You lied to me. You were supposed to be a snack, a burst of energy, a friend to carry me through until dinner. But that’s not what happened. Sure, the anticipation of meeting you was exquisite. Your softness against my lips. Your sweet taste . . .

But I digress. The sad thing was that after all that foreplay, you didn’t hold up your end of the bargain. After you were gone, I felt tired, not energized. In fact, worse than if I hadn’t had you at all. I put up with it for a while, but it has gone too far. This relationship has to end.

I’m sorry if I’ve never mentioned this before. I know you mean well. I appreciate the kind thought, but no, I really don’t think there’s anything you can do. No, another layer of frosting isn’t going to make a difference. Really. Yes, a fruit filling might make you more romantic, but that just doesn’t deal with the issue. We just weren’t made for each other.

Well, I wasn’t going to mention this to you, but yes, there is someone else. She’s from a different country. No, not Danish! She goes down smooth and gives me lasting energy. No, this isn’t about liking salty more than sweet. Besides, she’s a lot less salty now, more earthy, I’d say. She’s a vegetable juice.

No need to get personal! Vegetables may not be sexy, but they’re smart, and I have come to appreciate how much I like that. You know, I thought you would be a difficult habit to give up, but it turned out that you were easy to replace with something smart. Look, let’s not part as enemies. You’re sweet. You’re fun, particularly when you’re fresh. And we have known each other a long time. Can’t we just be friends?

Bill

More Proof That Busy Season Could Kill You

The following post is republished from AccountingWEB, a source of accounting news, information, tips, tools, resources and insight — everything you need to help you prosper and enjoy the accounting profession.

During the tax season of 1995-1996, Norm Lorch was not feeling well. He had a sore throat, but told himself it would go away. In any case, he did not have time to go to a doctor.

Lorch is principal of Owings Mills, Maryland-based Norman J. Lorch, Chartered, a firm that assists contractors, accountants, and attorneys in areas unique to government contracts.

Eventually, he spoke with a doctor on the phone who prescribed antibiotics – two weeks on and off – but he still did not feel much better. At one point, Lorch passed out, but he told himself that he had tripped on something, picked himself up, and went back to work.


While attending an American Bar Association conference, Lorch met a friend who would be conducting the session he was planning to attend. The friend told him in “pretty clear English” how he looked and said he needed to see a doctor. Lorch said no, but the friend insisted, saying that if Lorch didn’t call a doctor, he would stop the session.

Lorch set up an appointment for the next day. The doctor’s diagnosis was strep throat and made an appointment with a cardiologist for the following Monday. At first Lorch said “No, I have to go to Chicago,” but eventually he acquiesced. The strep had settled in Lorch’s aortic valve and destroyed it, causing congestive heart failure. He was given three to five days to live if he did not have immediate surgery.

“This is a crazy profession. Accountants are nuts. We work ourselves to death. I had allowed my clients to be the most important thing in my life. I didn’t listen to anybody,” Lorch told AccountingWEB.

“Making a few bucks less won’t kill you. When you are tired, quit. When you don’t feel good, stop working. Yes, some clients may leave, but they are going to find someone else if you die,” he said.

“I made a lot of money that year and eventually earned a penalty for underpayment of estimated taxes. I called the Internal Revenue Service to explain, spoke with a supervisor, and she said, ‘if you receive another penalty notice have them contact me.’

“Now, my priorities are my health and my family. My daughter had to leave college during her exams because of my medical condition, and I nearly missed her graduation. My clients can wait, and those that can’t wait can go. When you remember what comes first, everything else will fall in line,” Lorch said.

“When I teach, I tell everybody about this and what stress can do to your health because if I can help one person, it is worth it. I persuaded the moderator at an AICPA tax conference to allow me to speak to a group of 50 or 60 people when I wasn’t scheduled. As we were leaving, one man said, ‘Thank you very much. I am going to the hospital,’ Lorch said.

Since his illness, Lorch has lost weight and is careful what he eats. He walks five to seven days a week for one and a half miles. When he doesn’t feel well, he calls his doctor.

A specialist in financial oversight, compensation, and administration of U.S. government prime contracts and subcontracts, Lorch travels at least 50 percent of his working hours, but now plans travel with his health in mind. “I try to extend the hours, spreading two days of work over three.”

Earlier:
BKD Partner Found Dead at His Office