Rebranding

What Do Y’All Think of Baker Tilly’s New Logo and Tagline?

The Baker Tilly bird is gone: CHICAGO (Dec. 3, 2018) – Leading advisory, tax and assurance firm Baker Tilly Virchow Krause, LLP (Baker Tilly) today announced a refreshed brand identity with fellow Baker Tilly International network firms to demonstrate the network’s global strength and capability. Baker Tilly’s brand positioning, Now, for tomorrow captures the firm’s commitment to great […]

WIthum’s CEO Trying to Get Excited About the Firm’s New Logo

WithumSmith+Brown makes a video every year to celebrate….uh, their Withumness? Honestly, prior to slapping Uptown Funk behind people dancing in hats and sunglasses, the firm was best known for Tony Nitti working Simpsons references into everything from blog posts to lectures on Section 338(h)(10) elections.   But yes, these videos. The firm released another one yesterday […]

ICYMI: Dixon Hughes Goodman Is No Longer Such a Mouthful

If there's one thing that any modern accounting firm knows, it's that people can't be bothered to utter the names of long-dead founders when they refer to your organization. Hence the trend of rebrandings that trade ampersands and/or 3-4 names mashed together in no discernible order for 2-4 initials. As far as branding goes, there […]

Just FYI, Rothstein Kass Is Now Powered By Trust (and a Cell Phone Stand)

Apparently Rothstein Kass is boldly going where every accounting firm has gone before, kicking off a new age with a new logo, a new philosophy and a new mascot. The firm-wide email makes its way into our tip box: Today marks a new chapter in our firm’s history, and I’m thrilled to share it with […]

Ernst & Young Trusts That Everyone Knows Those ‘Sexy Boys’ Aren’t Building a Better Working World

As you know, earlier this month the accounting firm formerly known as Ernst & Young unveiled a major rebranding. We spoiled things a little bit by breaking the news early, but what no one knew — including, apparently, everyone involved in the makeover — was that there was quite a surprise awaiting anyone who searched Google […]

Here’s the New EY Logo and Tagline You’ve All Been Waiting For

We received a few messages with images over the weekend and there has been little reaction so far, other than "not really digging it." Personally, I'm a fan of brevity and seeing how PwC's big makeover was shocking, EY seems to have made things more sleek without drastically changing their look. We're soliciting feedback from […]

The New EY: A $50 Billion Revenue Goal, Squishy Independence, and Adios to the Ampersand

Nearly three years ago we surprised everyone with the news that PwC was rebranding itself. It was big news for awhile and not everyone liked the new look, but just like a website, eventually people get tired of bitching about the changes and they move on. Shortly thereafter, we highlighted an obscure report from Marketing […]

Plante Moran Drops Ampersand That No One Liked or Used Anyway

The accounting firm formerly known as Plante & Moran will forever going forward be known as Plante & Moran, according to a firm press release. And from the sound of things, it’s good riddance:

The change is prompted by tradition, growth and technology, according to Chief Marketing Officer and firm partner, Jeff Antaya. “The ampersand isn’t compatible with current and emerging technologies and can’t be used in a web address, for example,” notes Antaya. “Plus, many of Plante Moran’s entities, such as Plante Moran Financial Advisors and Plante Moran Global Services, never used the ampersand; nor is it part of the firm logo or signage. This change helps make the strong Plante Moran brand even more consistent.”

Ah, the PwC reasoning: no one calls us Plante & Moran, so why would we continue to be known as Plante & Moran? This ampersand has been ignored; it’s not appreciated; so get this eyesore of a graphical symbol out of our sight! But since the firm doesn’t want to hurt its feelings, there’s a bit of a send-off of sorts for the ol’ logogram.

Because the ampersand has been such an integral part of the firm’s history, and in keeping with the Plante Moran tradition of offering the option of preparing a departure memo for departing staff (fondly referred to as a “green memo” from when the firm used bulletin board memos as a key form of communication), the firm is sponsoring a green memo contest for staff. Titled, “& Now What?” the ampersand-less contest runs through September 20th and requires interested staff to prepare a departure memo of up to 500 words for the ampersand. Based on a staff vote, prizes will be awarded for the best memos and the winning essay will become the ampersand’s official green memo.

Is there anyone out there sad to see it go? Leave your well wishes below. Oh, and an advanced copy of your essay would be nice too. Email it to us.

Does That Make PwC Crestor?

“It looks like Gap is schilling for Lipitor.”

~ Dhani Mau, over at our sassy (former) sister site Fashionista, avoids the ED drugs.

Will Ernst & Young Be the Next Firm to Get a Makeover?

[caption id="attachment_18945" align="alignright" width="150" caption="No more square?"][/caption]

It sounds like it!

Judging by the article over at Marketing Week ideas are being kicked around and since Audits the Emmys!” Perhaps, “Zitor works for us!” Or simply, “Our opinion indicated that Lehman’s financial statements for that year were fairly presented in accordance with GAAP!”

Even a more important questions – should they incorporate a mascot? Maybe an E&Y Phanatic? A live animal may do the trick. Or this.

Let’s hear some ideas.

Ernst & Young looks to stand out among “big four” [Marketing Week]

Official New PwC Logo Launch Day: What Are You Doing with Your Old Business Cards?

Just in case you forgot gang, today is the official launch date for PwC’s new brand and logo. Despite the fact that everyone knew about this weeks ago, early October seems like the perfect time to remind people of how lovely it is to play Pong amongst the fall foliage, .

The other significant event of this day also reminds us of trees but not in a good way. You’ll remember that Bob Moritz stated in his FAQ (that don’t address color or shapes) that today would mark the day that new stationary would be put into use. This means that metric asstons of old PwC stationary, business cards, pens, tchotchkes, undies and so forth would be rendered completely useless.


This is especially awkward since P. Dubs just got done slapping themselves on the back for getting greener faster than a Whole Foods employee at sustainable living festival.

It’s entirely possible that the firm has undertaken various ideas to stem the amount of waste such as:

1) Encouraging everyone to use letterhead en masse running up to the logo launch
2) Having yard sales at offices nationwide to cut losses
3) They’re talking to the Met about a major donation to a future “Historical Corporate Crap” exhibition.

OR maybe they’re just having a giant weenie roast followed by s’mores for dessert (which we admit, would be pretty fun). If you’re engaging in a ritual of some sort and feel compelled to document the event, do get it touch with us and enjoy your fresh business cards.

Earlier:
Just in Case You Didn’t Think the PwC Rebranding Was Actually Happening

Bob Moritz Is Happy To Address Your FAQs on PwC’s New Logo That Don’t Concern Colors or Shapes

Okay people. By now some of you might be sick of hearing about PwC’s new logo that incorporates the beauty of autumn and your first Atari (look it up, young people). However, based on what we’re seeing in the traffic patterns, many are not, so we’ll truck on with Extreme Makeover: PwC Edition.

As we mentioned earlier this week, at least one person felt compelled to share their feelings on the switcheroo with PwC’s U.S. Chairman Bob Moritz. Whether that particular employee got their questions/concerns addressed is currently unknown, however Bob did address many popular questions in an email to the rank and file.

In his email, Roberto said that he’s perfectly okay with the feedback, even the negative stuff. But he implores that you don’t get hung up on the colors or building blocks because, well, it really has no bearing on anything and it’s silly to get caught up on something like appearances.

By now you’ve likely checked out the new PwC brand. Not surprisingly, I’ve gotten strong feedback from around the firm. Many love it. Some don’t. Few are neutral. With a firm of 30,000 smart people, there are going to be lots of opinions…and that’s okay. I ask that you don’t get caught up in the colors and logo; these changes to our visual identity are simply what we think reflects the evolution that has taken place within our firm as we continue to build a relationship-based, value-driven culture. The most important thing is that each of us understands what we’re doing and why, and can articulate what our brand means to our clients and to one another. And, it’s in line with what we’re doing around the network to create a more consistent brand worldwide. You’re going to hear more about the changes starting October 4, so stay tuned. In the meantime, click on FAQs below to read my responses to some of the feedback I’ve received.

Brand Frequently Asked Questions:

Q: Are we changing our name, and when do I use pwc instead of PwC?
A: First, our name is still PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP. That’s what we’ll use on formal and legal documents, and it will accompany the new brand in an appropriate manner in external materials. What we will call ourselves in day to day communications, though, is PwC. That’s really just acknowledging what people typically call us, and it’s easier for everybody than typing out our full name. In writing, we will still use PwC (uppercase “P,” lowercase “w,” and uppercase “C.”)

Just jumping in here: PwC appears to be assimilating to the idea that capitalization is irrelevant in this day and age of texts, IM so on and so forth.

Q: What is the timing of the change to the new brand?
A: Although we have kept the details under wraps to help us maximize the impact in the market, this transition has been in the planning stages for some time — and is part of our overall network strategy. The transition began gradually with the PwC network’s global website (pwc.com), which changed on September 20. On October 4, the official brand launch date, there will be a number of highly visible changes here in the US, from building signs to new stationery. Beyond that, though, we expect the transition to take time. Network firms will have the option to change at their own pace. In the US, we are moving faster because we see it as an opportunity to engage in dialogues with our clients and the market about the very real changes we are making in how we build relationships and create value. The changes to our logo, colors, look and feel are symbols of the broader changes being made to the firm and the global network.

In terms of visible changes, we will have most of our building signs replaced by the end of this calendar year. We have been working with our EAs and TAs, Document Production, and Graphic Design to tackle the thousands of printed and electronic documents that will need to be converted, looking first to those with the greatest impact on our interaction with our clients. This process will take time, and we’ll need everyone’s patience and support as we make the changes.

Q: Will we get new business cards?
Yes, all partners and staff (and that includes client service staff, IFS staff and EAs/TAs) will receive business cards, which will provide each of you with a great resource to help you connect with others, build on the relationships you have and help the firm deliver value. More to come on when and how to order business cards following our October 4 launch date.

Whether this affects the pace of greenness at PwC isn’t entirely clear.

Q: With the economy just climbing out of a recession, why are we spending money on this change now?
A: Timing was clearly a consideration. We have set ambitious goals for our network of firms–and we are counting on our brand to work harder for us as we distinguish ourselves from our competitors. There will never be a better time to begin the transition to our new brand, and by starting now, we will be well-positioned as the economy improves.

There will be some costs associated with the change. In the US, they will include the cost of building signage and consumable items such as stationery, business cards and printed materials. Overall, this spend is minimal in relation to our size and is certainly not significant to our annual operating budget. If we treat the brand re-launch as an important opportunity to engage with our clients and each other–to discuss how together we will improve relationships and create value–the money we spend on the launch will be paid back many times over.

Anything not covered above can be asked below but if you must, further comments, questions, concerns about the colors and/or geometry of the logo will not be dismissed.

Just in Case You Didn’t Think the PwC Rebranding Was Actually Happening

This should quell any doubts.

This was the scene outside 300 Madison Ave. in New York last night. A sad day indeed. Leave a caption or your eulogy in the comments.

BREAKING: At Least One PwC Employee Isn’t Sold on the Rebranding

It’s been just over a week since we broke the story on PwC’s rebranding. Now that everyone else has caught up to the story, we’ll share with you some fresh news on the makeover.

Since today marks the first day of u’re warming up to the new team colors. Then again, you may share the feelings of one P. Dubs employee that took the time to email Bob Moritz to chime in on the new look. Apparently (not really sure how these things happen) the email is making the rounds at PwC and it just so happened to find its way into our mail bag:

To be perfectly honest, I’m not a fan of the new branding. In your email you wrote “…we are altering what we believe is an outdated visual identity to better express the kind of vibrant and relationship-based firm we have evolved into.” I find it ironic that you referred to our former visual identity as outdated when our new brand looks like a throwback – a 70s color scheme meets an IT startup.

I completely agree with the comments on the website where the brand is repeatedly referred to as child-like and unprofessional. I feel like the explanation for the symbol is also very complex. The *connectedthinking brand was simple and easy to understand. With the new symbol, everything has a meaning, from the colors to the solid blocks to the transparent blocks. A symbol should be fairly self explanatory – this one requires too much explanation.

I love the fact that the company has been focusing more on changing behaviors and placing a greater emphasis on building relationships. However, I fail to see where a new brand would affect this. Colors and symbols don’t represent PwC, the staff does. In one of the online discussions it was pointed out that following a salary freeze one year and layoffs the following year, it almost seems foolish to spend so much money to “reinvent” ourselves. To quote a wise PwC employee, “A new brand isn’t going to win business, motivated people will.” I find it hard to believe that this new, colorful symbol will be the motivation that people need to help expand our business and improve relationships with clients. A better way to motivate the staff would be more incentives – bonuses, rewards, raises – positive reinforcement. Pavlov was definitely on to something with the concept. Interactive gallery stations complete with iPads to show off the brand? Activities revolving around the launch of this new brand? Is this really the best method of spending funds?

Also disturbing to me is the environmental impact this could have. I can’t imagine that this won’t set back the Firm-wide goal of reducing our carbon footprint. Letterhead, business cards, report covers, envelopes (to name a few paper products) all need to be reprinted. It seems like an incredible waste to discard everything we already have in favor of this new brand (we received an email letting us know that after October 4th we are not to use any of the old paper products). I hope we are at least planting a bunch of trees to help compensate Mother Nature for the amount of paper that will be wasted with this change.

It’s disappointing to feel like we have taken two steps forward and three steps back. I realize that it is what it is, but I felt that I should voice my opinion from down here on the totem pole.

It’s been suggested that October 4th will be the great PwC Shredding Day that will no doubt involve a convoy of Shred-it trucks out 300 Madison (and offices nationwide for that matter) along with employees dropping their old business cards into every fish bowl they can find.

So mark it on your calendars and definitely document the shredding in action or perhaps a bonfire (done safely and in full accordance with the law) and send us the pictures.

Protecting Your Online Identity or, Alternatively, How Not to Get Busted Being a Subversive at Work

It amazes me that fairly intelligent people manage to do really stupid things, sometimes on a consistent basis. One of these things is being sloppy about one’s online identity or, more specifically, publicly participating in any conversation that might ruffle management’s feathers. What on Earth could I be talking about?

Let’s take a look at the popular public accounting video series by YouTube user witn3ssthefitn3ss – or more specifically, witn3ssthefitn3ss’s 266 subscribers. Among them, several users who have (oh-so-creatively) used their first and last names as user names. Now there probably isn’t anything in your company manual that specifically states you are not allowed to subscribe to YouTube videos that paint the profession in a less than flattering light and let’s face it, odds that HR even knows how to find YouTube are slim to none but regardless, it’s bad Internet behavior and I’ve got to call these kids out for it.


For example, Michael V Staub (YouTube user michaelvstaub, how convenient!) appears to be working for PwC in Chicago. See how easy it is for any idiot to track your activity on the Internets, kids? I just did it and it took me all of two minutes.

Now Mike is more than welcome to subscribe to any YouTube channel he wants to but in an uncertain job market, it might be a better strategy to C.Y.A. (Cover Your Ass) and have the Internet wherewithall to come up with a better user name than, oh, your entire name. Especially if you’re going to be liking videos that make management look like slave-driving taskmasters.

There are more, like Joseph Bailey, an E&Y manager in Florida. Again, maaaaybe there is some other Joseph R. Bailey subscribing to these videos under his real name but we just don’t see it being that much of a coincidence.

The point is, your social identity is as much a commodity as your education and professional experience. Don’t carelessly throw it out there where anyone can track your likes and dislikes. Take the time to separate your personal and professional lives or you can pretty much guarantee a whole bunch of hassle later on down the road. Sure, it was only an accounting video this time but what if management takes it personally and thinks you only liked it because one of them had the audacity to ask you for a McDonald’s Diet Coke?

Watch what you do out there, kids, the entire world is watching. There are billions of usernames you can come up with, don’t make the mistake of using your own first and last unless you are an Internet marketer or sticking strictly to completely safe-for-work material.

Update: Details about licensure have been removed as we have confirmed Illinois’ tricky licensing requirements and our poster in question is, in fact, fully licensed.

(UPDATE 3) McGladrey’s Giant Putting Green Cake Will Ensure That Everyone Gets to Celebrate Their Rebranding

Webcam chat at Ustream

In the best example that we’ve seen of accounting firm make-up sex, today the RSM McGladrey and McGladrey & Pullen announced that they will now be branded under one name…McGladrey. Since the deciders on the name checked imagination at the door, the firms make it up to all of us with the best possible solution – building a giant putting green cake.


One of the duffers sponsored by McGladrey, Chris DiMarco, will attempt to chip in on the green later today and with any luck you’ll be able to watch it above as it happens.

As exciting as that is, it isn’t entirely clear whether or not this also serves as a tasty distraction from the layoffs and restructuring that is going on McGladrey. Kick that around if you like but also consider the fact that Natalie Gulbis doesn’t seem to be jumping out of this thing at any point in time, and that is a travesty that cannot go unnoticed.

UPDATE: We’ve been assured that the cake’s tastiness or lack thereof will be communicated to us later today. Whether or not there will be pre-cake jays, gallons of Vitamin D milk to wash it down or couches to pass out on has not been determined. Discuss and keep us updated. Spare no details – flavor, frosting, texture, etc.

UPDATE 2: Okay you guys – who witnessed this sorry-ass display? Natalie wouldn’t have disappointed the crowd like these losers. And then someone skulls one right into the camera? Video is completely gone right now. Unbelievable. Get back to us on this cake.

UPDATE 3: The report on the cake is in:

1) The cake is, actually, pretty big. And, it’s all cake, except for the part of the logo, which is made of rice krispie treats.
2) As for a slice of that cake…quite good, actually. The cake part is marble, and very soft and tasty. I nabbed what might be a corner piece with the “rough” frosting. It’s a lot of frosting. A lot.

I’d give the cake a solid A-. There will be a lot to save in the next few days!

Two minutes later we got his follow-up:

I had to stop eating it halfway through — I think I’d go into diabetic shock if I ate any more of it. The grade gets downgraded to a B+.

RSM McGladrey and McGladrey & Pullen, LLP, Launch New “McGladrey” Brand [McGladrey]