December 15, 2018

Financial Accounting Foundation

Financial Accounting Foundation Offers Solution to Anyone Trying to Catch a Few Winks at Lunch

If only they could do it every day. The FAF said that future public FAF Trustee meetings, including the public sessions of the upcoming Aug. 20, 2013 meeting, will be audio-streamed live on the FAF’s Web site at www.accountingfoundation.org/webcasts. The meeting is scheduled to take place at the Omni Berkshire Place in New York City. […]

Financial Accounting Foundation Seems Slightly Annoyed with the AICPA’s New Accounting Method for Small Business

Judging by the AICPA's PR blitz, you'd think that everyone was excited about their release of its Financial Reporting Framework for Small- and Medium-Sized Entities. Just out of curiousity, I went back and I read three articles on the subject from Accounting Today, the Wall Street Journal, and the New York Times to see if there was any dissent on […]

Nice Neighborhood Dad Named New FASB Chairman

Russell Golden will be your new FASB Chairman effective July 1st. He's been at the Board since 2004, after being a partner in Deloitte's National Office Accounting Services department. Since joining the FASB, he's held various technical positions and even chaired the Emerging Issues Task Force for a time. He has all the chops that you'd want […]

What Would You Say if Someone Told You That a Trustee of the Financial Accounting Foundation Was on the Audit Committee of Morgan Keegan During a Huge Accounting Scandal?

Maybe, "Oh, that's fascinating." Perhaps, "Can't say that I'm surprised." Or, probably more likely, "Will this affect my raise?" Jonathan Weil has the story of Mary Stone, who is a trustee of the Financial Accounting Foundation, but prior to her appointment was an audit committee of Morgan Keegan & Co. when a bunch of their mutual […]

Oh For God’s Sake, Bank of America’s Former CFO Is Being Appointed Chairman of a Council That Advises the FASB

Chuck Noski was CFO of BofA for only one year and is still a vice chairman at the bank and is probably a very competent individual but Jesus, has the Financial Accounting Foundation no sense of the reputation of this particular bank? Further, have they heard nothing about the collective reputation of banks these days?


Guess not:

Mr. Noski’s appointment was announced by John J. Brennan, chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Financial Accounting Foundation (FAF). The FAF is responsible for the oversight, administration, and financing of the FASB and its counterpart for state and local governments, the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB).

“With his breadth of experience in corporate finance across a range of industries, Chuck Noski will bring to the FASAC a deep understanding of the complex issues facing the FASB as it seeks to serve the best interests of all those who use, prepare, and audit financial statements,” Mr. Brennan said. “We are very pleased to welcome him as the new FASAC chairman.”

At least the ABA will have a direct line for their hate mail now.

[via FAF]

FAF Chairman Isn’t Interested in the FASB Taking a Backseat in Accounting Rulemaking

In a November 15 letter to the SEC, FAF chairman John J. Brennan wrote that reducing FASB’s role in setting U.S. financial reporting standards “may weaken the positive leverage that U.S. GAAP and U.S. standard setting have provided to improving accounting standards for investors in the world’s most robust and transparent capital markets.” The FAF also disputed the SEC staff’s proposed goal of achieving one set of global accounting standards. Instead, the organization feels that “a more practical goal for the foreseeable future is to achieve highly comparable (but not necessarily identical) financial reporting standards among the most developed capital markets that are based on a common set of international standards.” [CFO]

AICPA Practically Begging the Financial Accounting Foundation to Develop Private Company GAAP

Were you aware that over 2,500 letters have been sent to the Financial Accounting Foundation “demanding” the development of private company GAAP as well as a separate independent board to oversee the standards? If no, why not? If yes, why aren’t you feigning rage, issuing press releases with impatient statements by various bigwigs? If you’re the AICPA, that’s exactly what you’re doing:

For almost 40 years, the pleas of private companies to set standards for financial reporting that are more relevant too often have been ignored. The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) believes that it is time for the Financial Accounting Foundation (FAF) to listen to the constituents who have written to FAF demanding differential financial reporting standards for private companies and a separate independent board to oversee those standards. There are approximately 28 million privately held U.S. companies, accounting for more than 50 percent of our economy.

“Ninety nine percent of the letters from the privately held company constituency demanded that the Financial Accounting Foundation create differential standards for privately held companies,” said Barry Melancon, AICPA president and CEO. “We’ve studied this problem for far too long.”

Pick up the pace, FAF. People are getting antsy.

[via AICPA]