September 22, 2018

Bill Romanowski

Accounting News Roundup: Genzyme Wants Bigger Offer from Sanofi; IRS Says Ex-NFL Star Romanowski Owes $6 Mil; Convicted Tax Evader Traficant Running for Congress Again | 08.31.10

Genzyme Rejects Sanofi’s Overture [WSJ]
“Genzyme Corp.’s board again rejected an $18.5 billion takeover proposal from Sanofi-Aventis SA, although Genzyme suggested it would be open to future talks if there were a higher starting price.

Genzyme’s suggestion contrasts with accusations from Sanofi Chief Executive Chris Viehbacher that he “encountered a brick wall” in trying to begin merger talks. And with the French drug maker stressing its discipline in pursuing the Cambridge, Mass., biotech, the rhetoric from both sides hints that any deal could take some time.”

No horsing around, IRS tells ex-NFL star [Forbes]
“The Internal Revenue Service says ex-football star linebacker Bill Romanowski owes more than $6 million, primarily for claiming losses from a thoroughbred horse-breeding investment whose promoters have admitted was a fraudulent tax shelter.

Romanowski, 44, and his wife, Julie, filed a lawsuit last month in U.S. Tax Court disputing an IRS bill for $5 million in taxes, $1 million in penalties and an unspecified amount of interest. According to his complaint, for the years 1998 to 2004, the Romanowskis said their total taxable income was a negative $11 million. The IRS said it really was $14 million. The difference is a cool $25 million.”

Higher Taxes May Not Push Firms To Cut Dividends [WSJ]
“The expiration of a tax cut on dividend income wouldn’t likely spur firms to significantly cut their dividend payouts, say some scholars who study the relationship between tax rates and corporate behavior.

One big reason is that a growing share of U.S. equities are held by retirement funds and foreign investors that aren’t swayed by U.S. individual income-tax rates.

‘If there is an effect, it will be modest,’ University of North Carolina professor Douglas Shackelford said of the pending higher tax rates. ‘Pension funds, 401(k)’s, foreigners and corporations–all of these don’t care’ about the individual tax rate, he said.”

Alabama county mulling whether to keep, jettison SAP [Reuters]
Jefferson County, Alabama is the latest to have trouble with their SAP system. Unfortunately for JeffCo, they don’t have a huge consulting operation to sue, only an unnamed “third-party consulting firm.”


Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner! [Taxable Talk]
James Traficant, that’s who. Traficant was indicted in ’02 (while serving in Congress) on federal corruption charges and ultimately found guilty on ten counts that included bribery and tax evasion. Despite that track record, he has managed to get the necessary amount of signatures to run as an independent in Ohio’s 17th Congressional District.

Accounting firm raided over alleged drug network [ABC Australia]
Don’t think it can’t happen to you!