July 21, 2018

Oscars

pwc oscars 2018

PwC Keeps The Oscars Gig

After dealing with weeks of embarrassment, brand damage, ridicule, repeated apologies, rejection and capitulation, PwC has finally caught a break. The Hollywood Reporter reports that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has decided to retain the firm to tabulate the ballots for the Oscars despite the colossal screw-up that happened with the Best […]

PwC-Oscar-Fail-envelopegate

Exposure Drafts: Best Picture Definitely Didn’t Go To Manchester by the PwC

This is a special weekend edition of Exposure Drafts. Send suggestions to [email protected]

PwC Trying New Gimmick for the Oscars

In case you hadn't heard, the nominees for this year's Academy Awards in the acting categories are even less diverse than the accounting profession. That's quite an accomplishment! I'll bet the Academy members wish they could blame PwC for this, but alas, the firm has been tabulating the ballots far too long; throwing them under […]

How Neil Patrick Harris Met Your Accounting Firm

If you guessed, "A kid doctor needed help with his taxes," you would be wrong. No turning back: Dropped off my official #Oscars predictions to the two people in charge of the ballots at @pwc_llp. pic.twitter.com/WXawVsDcbu — Neil Patrick Harris (@ActuallyNPH) February 19, 2015

The Real Loser at the Oscars This Year Was PwC

Yeah yeah, we're a little late talking about the Oscars but we wanted to let everyone get the noteworthy stuff out of the way first — the Ellen selfie, old lady hating, and of course John Travolta's name butchering (not coincidentally, I ran Colin's name through the Slate generator and it came out Colin) — […]

Is the PwC Oscar® Team Really Incorruptible?

PwC issued a press release today announcing their nearly eight-decade run tabulating the ballots for the Academy Awards. From now until the broadcast, we’ll be treated with more PwC mentions on Entertainment Tonight than anyone should bear. Personally, I’m of the opinion that the Golden Globes is a better gig due to all the drunken shenanigans, […]

Hugh Jackman’s Excitement for PwC’s Role in Oscar Night Not Shared by the Old Man

We all know that PwC can hardly contain their excitement when talk of the Oscars starts. After all, they've been tabulating the ballots since the events that inspired The Passion of the Christ occurred and they are very proud of that fact. This year, Hugh Jackman is widely thought to be a favorite for a […]

PwC Basks in the Oscar Gold

Man, PwC is on a tear this week. Along with the announcement of the three-peat yesterday for the Training 125, the firm also rolled out its press release on the upcoming Academy Awards.

The firm is proudly counting the ballots for the 76th year in a row but this year there are ten best picture nominations and that’s a new wrinkle for the vote counters at P. Dubs.

Now we’re not going to insinuate anything like Slate did back in 2007 where they somehow made a superficial connection between scandals at PwC to their ability to count ballots. That’s just foolhardy and we wouldn’t entertain such a notion here.


Quite the contrary, this should be the biggest slam dunk engagement that PwC has. Sure there are some archaic mechanical issues (e.g. the U.S. Mail) but at the end of the day they’re just counting ballots. The biggest risk that PwC faces is someone trying to rip their arms off with the briefcases still attached. Besides, we’re sure there is a security device on the briefcases that will destroy the entire contents if opened by anyone other than a PwC partner.

But we digress.

Back to the boilerplate press release, PwC drops all kinds of facts on us including that it takes ten total days (between the nominating and the final ballots) and approximately 1,700 “person-hours” for the team to count the ballots by hand.

This begs the question: could the Oscars be indirectly responsible for PwC being embroiled in the wage and hour lawsuits? Is our insatiable demand for red carpets and Brangelina driven the importance of this annual event beyond health care reform, financial regulation, and U.S. GAAP/IFRS convergence and thus, created the sweatshop engagement that is the counting of the Academy Award ballots?

This prestigious engagement may have its benefits (e.g. tuxedos, the opportunity for awkward sexual advances on celebrities) but at what cost, dear reader? What cost?