July 15, 2018

Complaint Department

To Whom It May Going Concern: Journalistic Integrity or the Lack Thereof; Someone Needs a Kuddle; Black Jokes?!

It's been a bit since we've done a To Whom It May Going Concern and that could be because a lot of you have been too busy to send us a steady stream of hate mail, lame tips and vague complaints. Things must be slowing down, though, because our beloved hate mail and nonsense is […]

PwC Employee More Upset By Aura 4 Than He Was When Facebook Switched to Timeline

The Tip Box that you see at the right and top of the page has been a moderate success. Thanks to its simplicity, even the most dense of you can send us information that could prove useful for a story worthy of these pages. And make no mistake, we do appreciate the dense messages; not […]

Just So You’re Aware: Your Experience with IRS Can Now Be Rated on a Scale of One to Five Dog Bones

The following post is republished from AccountingWEB, a source of accounting news, information, tips, tools, resources and insight — everything you need to help you prosper and enjoy the accounting profession.

Consumers with a bone to pick with the Internal Revenue Service have the opportunity to share their experiences. Originally designed as an IRS profile database, IRSDoghouse.com has evolved into a free and anonymous Web site where anyone can rate – negatively or positively – their personal and professional experiences with IRS employees.

The IRS certainly holds the tax-paying public to task and now is the time for practitioners and other tax-paying individuals to reward or bite back, according to the site’s creators. Ratings are based on dog bones, with a single dog bone rating as the least favorable; five dog bones is the best rating.


People share personal experiences and can post information about the IRS employee, including whether the employee was helpful, clueless, difficult to work with, or knowledgeable. Reviews allow for character descriptions and other details. In the characteristic section, one reviewer explained that this IRS employee has been a government employee too long. She was clueless, difficult to work with, and would be fired if she worked in the private sector. The IRS employee received one dog bone.

On the other hand, a positive review of five bones reported that the IRS employee was able to negotiate, was fair, helpful, intelligent, and interacted with him in a kind, courteous, and professional manner. This IRS employee demonstrated positive communication skills and a pleasant attitude. He was a pleasure to work with and gave the benefit of the doubt to the practitioner/taxpayer. He also allowed ample time to comply with requests. “This is one of the good guys in the IRS,” the rater said.

The Web site provides people with IRS complaints a safe and anonymous place to vent or to share feel-good stories. And, if people don’t wish to post any comments at all, they can still read about practitioners’ and other tax payer experiences to know what they might be up against.

The site is free to use and is monitored for extreme profanity, hateful comments, and threats, which are removed. The administrator of this site has the authority to remove any posting that is not deemed appropriate.