PwC Employee More Upset By Aura 4 Than He Was When Facebook Switched to Timeline

The Tip Box that you see at the right and top of the page has been a moderate success. Thanks to its simplicity, even the most dense of you can send us information that could prove useful for a story worthy of these pages. And make no mistake, we do appreciate the dense messages; not only does it give everyone at Team GC a good chuckle but also a snapshot into your lives as stewards of the capital markets. 

The downside is that some tipsters treat it as virtual porcelain god that acts as a receptacle for their verbal projectile vomit because something has irked them well past the point of silence. Earlier this year, Adrienne tried to dispense some advice on how avoid that but, as you might expect, it still happens. 
PwC just rolled out Aura 4 this past weekend and I've spent the last 30 minutes or so playing with it.  Needless to say, it's a huge step back from the last version.  They decided it was necessary to make it all pretty by iconifying and coloring everything.  Not to mention breaking simple organizational functions like collapsing controls. The firm invested a lot of money in this program, and all they've done is made it harder for us.
No! Not "needless to say." It's quite the opposite, in fact. No one – save PwC employees that also must deal with this new Aura 4 – knows what you're talking about, but at least it's CLEAR that you're peeved and felt compelled to share your annoyance with the group and that's important. Getting something off your chest will certainly help you feel better whether or not anything really changes and now that it's out there people can agree with you or call you and the other rubes out for not appreciating the more subtle things about Aura 4. 
 
Anyway, since we don't have much to go on, we're sure you'll adapt. Or you won't. Whatever.

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