July 16, 2018

Man Who Found $9 Million Lotto Ticket While Preparing His Tax Return Thinks Everyone Should Get Some Perspective

Last Irvin Przyborski found a year-old lotto ticket while he was preparing his tax return and wouldn’t you know, it just so happened to be winner worth $9 million. As if winning the lotto wasn’t lucky enough, Irv managed to cash it in just a few days before it expired. Now you might think to yourself, “$9 million! What a lucky guy! He must be feeling extremely lucky and grateful!” but then you wouldn’t know Irv Przyborski.

Przyborski, reached Thursday afternoon and weary from the day’s constant media attention, was unimpressed with the development. “What’s the big deal? It’s not even worth putting in your paper,” Przyborski said outside his East Side home. “It’s like watching paint dry.” Despite his nonchalance, the 61-year-old retired truck driver admitted he would have been upset had he missed the deadline. Nevertheless, he said the prize was hardly life-changing and he had no grand plans for the money. “Look at the people who are out of work,” he said. “People with Ph.D.s can’t find work. There’s nothing joyful about winning money in a situation like this.”

This seems appropriate.

Under the wire and into the money — $9 million winner: ‘What’s the big deal?’ [CT]

Irvin Przyborski found a year-old lotto ticket while he was preparing his tax return and wouldn’t you know, it just so happened to be winner worth $9 million. As if winning the lotto wasn’t lucky enough, Irv managed to cash it in just a few days before it expired. Now you might think to yourself, “$9 million! What a lucky guy! He must be feeling extremely lucky and grateful!” but then you wouldn’t know Irv Przyborski.

Przyborski, reached Thursday afternoon and weary from the day’s constant media attention, was unimpressed with the development. “What’s the big deal? It’s not even worth putting in your paper,” Przyborski said outside his East Side home. “It’s like watching paint dry.” Despite his nonchalance, the 61-year-old retired truck driver admitted he would have been upset had he missed the deadline. Nevertheless, he said the prize was hardly life-changing and he had no grand plans for the money. “Look at the people who are out of work,” he said. “People with Ph.D.s can’t find work. There’s nothing joyful about winning money in a situation like this.”

This seems appropriate.

Under the wire and into the money — $9 million winner: ‘What’s the big deal?’ [CT]

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The IRS Has Gotten Wise to Dead People Seeking Refunds

Pulling off tax fraud is a tough proposition. Hell, even the guys that are good at it get busted.

Plus, despite our low expectations, the IRS has managed to get wise to the filing of tax returns with huge refunds. To try and pull such a stunt will not help your burgeoning criminal career.

Another bad jig (seemingly) would be to attempt filing a tax return seeking a refund for a dead person. Despite what some might consider to be a no-brainer, a couple of guys in California still thought it was worth a shot. Web CPA Reports that Haroon Amin and his partner Ather Ali filed tax returns for 250 dead individuals in 2002 and 2003.

The IRS got wise to some of this but still managed to send out a few checks to addresses controlled by the two men. Mr. Amin pleaded guilty today and faces up to five years in prison where hopefully he can get some help improving his criminal instincts.

Man Pleads Guilty to Filing 250 Tax Returns for Dead People [Web CPA]

Grant Thornton to Close Greensboro, NC Office

We’ve received multiple tips informing us that Grant Thornton’s Greensboro, North Carolina office will be closing in the spring after busy season has ended.

Greensboro has approximately 35 professionals in all three service lines although our sources indicate that many tax professionals were laid off late last year in anticipation of the closure. Greensboro currently functions as a satellite of the Charlotte office which houses the support professionals.

What’s not known at this time is whether the office will become virtual, similar to the setup that Ernst & Young arranged for its Greensboro office other whether it will be an outright closure.

We contacted Grant Thornton for comment and had not heard back from them at the time of this posting.

If you’re familiar with the situation in Greensboro and have more information, get in touch with us. We’ll continue to keep you updated as we learn more.