Letting Employees Wear Jeans Might Help Solve Your Talent Problem

Last year around this time, we were dawning on the era of denim in the accounting profession. It started with Baker Tilly, picked up steam with Crowe Horwath, faced some backlash and then finally hit the mainstream in the spring when PwC went all in

I'm sure there's a number of people out there that would rather set their framed CPA certificates on fire than allow anyone to wear jeans at the office, but there's something you denim-haters should know — it could help, at least in part, solve your talent problem.

A recent survey from CareerBuilder found that more than one in five workers are planning to change jobs in 2017. This number is even higher for workers aged 18 to 34, around 35%, plan to find a new job. That's precisely the age demo of employees that accounting firms are desperate to hang on to.

They're especially desperate because it's become extremely hard to fill the holes left behind by young CPAs who seek more money, a better quality life or looking for something that's NOT accounting.

So for those firms that are trying to stem the tide going out, the survey shared some insights on what would keep the respondents in a job:

When asked what extra perks would make them more willing to join or stay with a company, the most popular choices workers pointed to include:

  • Half-day Fridays: 40 percent
  • On-site fitness center: 27 percent
  • Being able to wear jeans: 23 percent
  • Daily catered lunches: 22 percent
  • My own office: 22 percent

Alright, since busy season is upon us, I doubt many firms would go for the half-day Fridays. An on-site fitness center might not be feasible for a lot firms and we’ve already established that free food only goes so far, especially during busy season. And since we even have to have this conversation, I'm sure giving everyone an office is out of the question. So maybe try the jeans, then?

[CareerBuilder via CGMA]

Image: iStock/Szepy

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