June 23, 2018

Here’s Your Open Thread for Crowe Horwath Compensation Discussions (2016)

It's unfortnate that we don't hear more news about Crowe Horwath. It's a Top 10 firm with more than $700 million in revenue last year. That means it's only one big merger away from joining the billion-dollar firm club and closing the gap between it's Tier-2 rivals — RSM, Grant Thornton and BDO. WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR, CROWE?

But I suppose when it comes to this site, no news is good news. Unless you're telling the world that your employees can wear whatever they want and work wherever they want. That's good for the ol' brand, I suppose.

And compensation, of course. It's typically hit and miss with CH, some years they get lumped in with other firms, other years they get their own thread and some years we totally forget them (if you manage to dig up the 2015 thread, let me know; I can't find it anywhere).

Anyway, since it's an election year rife with populism, it seems appropriate to give Crowe Horwath its very own post for discussing their meager pay. Or maybe it's handsome pay! That's why we're here, to talk it out. Here's your checklist:

  • Position, promotion (if applicable)
  • City (region is not informative) & Line of Service
  • % Raise 
  • % Bonus (if any)
  • Old & New Base

Have fun.

More compensation season:
PwC
RSM
Grant Thornton
BDO

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Forbes: Senior Accountants Pay Rising in the Recession

Feel free to call bullshit on this because we’ve heard rumors about pay freezes at KPMG (they are getting back to us on this) but according to Forbes, senior accountants rank at #11 for “Hot Jobs Where Pay is Rising” in the recession. The list states median pay at $60,300. Not only that but apparently, there aren’t enough of you senior accountants:

There’s a shortage of senior accountants right now, and the recession has actually provided a chance for them to revive client relationships, believes Mark Koziel, senior manager of firm practice management at the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. “As long as there’s small-business America, as long as there’s big-business America, there will still be a need to do auditing and tax returns,” he says.

This strikes us as strange as there have been layoffs at several firms. The need for auditing and is obvious but those of you left are probably doing the work of two or three people.
UPDATE, July 22, 2009: KPMG got back to us re: pay freezes and had no comment