EY Is Tackling the Important Issue of Dudes’ Need for Flexibility

Forget women, what about working family men? Apparently they are the forgotten majority who are lost in discussions about work/life balance that include a demanding job and kids.

EY partner and "Inclusiveness Officer" Karyn Twaronite recently wrote this piece in HuffPo asking what about the men? Well? What about them?

Thankfully, EY's male professionals increasingly speak up about the importance of flexibility, whether they are married or single, with or without children. Many are high achieving, progressive and aspire to have it all. While they have different life demands, they all want a dynamic career and a meaningful life outside of work. Yet, in today's workplaces, the conversation about flexibility largely centers only on women. So, we need to ask "What about the men?"

Consider this:

  • Men's job demands have climbed, according to a Families and Work Institute study, The New Male Mystique. Perceptions of having to work very fast and hard have increased. Technology has blurred the boundaries between work and non-work. In fact, 41 percent of men say they are contacted at least once a week or more by colleagues outside of normal working hours. This creates a longer workday than ever before and 54 percent of men surveyed indicated they'd prefer to work fewer hours.
  • At the same time, however, job security has declined. According to data from the U.S. Department of Labor, median weekly earnings of men age 25 and older employed full-time in both wage and salaried jobs have actually declined slightly, adjusted for inflation. Men are working harder for less take-home money.
  • Additionally, with more dual career households, men are taking on added family responsibilities. Furthermore, a Pew study shows that for men and women of all ages, being a good parent and having a successful marriage continue to rank significantly higher among their priorities than career success.

In short, the workplace is changing and men experience many of the same work-life conflicts as women.

OK, first of all, "inclusiveness officer" really? And now we need an Inclusiveness Officer to include the group to which women and minorities needed to be included?

This article will have you believe EY has created an open, honest workplace where men and women alike can communicate their needs to the firm and take all the time they need as long as the work gets done:

Men need to be open about their need for and use of flexibility, both informal and formal. When you know your colleague is using flexibility, it's easier to feel comfortable using it yourself. Ensure your organization has appropriate forums representing many demographics where both women and men can talk to one another, compare notes and give support.

Wow, that sounds so easy. Does this mean a whole team can take turns going to Little League games and changing diapers in the middle of busy season as long as they talk it out?

Anyone buying this nonsense?

Related articles