September 26, 2018

EY Employee Shot in Las Vegas Remains in Coma After Surgery

ernst & young report ashley madison

Tina Frost, an EY employee, was one of the more than 500 people wounded at Sunday’s horrific mass shooting in Las Vegas. The details of her story are terrifying:

Frost, a 27-year-old Anne Arundel County-native, was attending the ‘Route 91 Harvest Festival’ with her co-workers and longtime boyfriend, Austin Hughes, when the barrage of gunfire erupted, a single bullet struck Frost in the forehead. The bullet pierced the frontal lobes of her brain before ricocheting, landing in her right eye.

“She’s stable, but obviously still very critical,” said Amy Klinger, a family friend who works with Frost’s mother at a commercial real estate development firm located in Potomac. “Her right eye needed to be removed. Doctors put an implant or placeholder in there for now because they don’t want the brain to swell into that area.”

Klinger explained how Hughes and Frost’s friends carried her limp body across the panic-stricken infield, roughly 300 yards in total. That is when the group spotted the owner of a pickup truck loading injured people into the cargo hold. Hughes secured a spot for Frost. The pickup drove to the Sunrise Hospital Emergency Room, some six miles away.

Washington, DC ABC affiliate WJLA reports that EY sent an HR rep to help Frost’s family:

“Ernst & Young has actually been unbelievable in all of this. They sent an HR person from California to basically be the family’s handler throughout this week. They made all of their hotel reservations, they are making sure they are having all of their meals. There’s somebody on the ground whose sole job is to take care of the family.”

A GoFundMe page has been set up on behalf of Frost. As of today, it has raised over $385,000.

[WJLA]

Image: EuroCarGT/Wikimedia Commons

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