July 19, 2018

Some Cryptocurrency Traders Opting for ‘Screw It’ Tax Compliance Approach

bitcoin-cash-cryptocurrency-accountant

Here’s an amusing New York Times column by Kevin Roose that features a rafter of cryptocurrency traders distressed about their tax situations. As we noted earlier this year, some crypto traders got mad/sad upon learning that taxes were a thing they had to deal with. And according to Laura Walter, aka Crypto Tax Girl, some traders have moved beyond the grief stage to denial:

Ms. Walter said she had seen clients with cryptocurrency gains as large as $400,000 who did not withhold taxes during the year and subsequently lost money trading. “Now they’re stuck with these huge tax bills, and they don’t have the capital to pay it.”

Faced with such problems, some cryptocurrency traders have decided to avoid the issue entirely, by not declaring any cryptocurrency on their taxes and hoping for the best. According to Credit Karma, which provides tax-filing services, fewer than 100 of the 250,000 people who had used the company’s tax-filing software as of February reported cryptocurrency transactions, a rate below 0.04 percent.

Sure, why not. Although I’d venture that “To hell with reporting our gains” ranks high on the scale of idiotic tax strategies. Still, one consultant quoted by Roose says, “No one believes they’ll get in trouble,” which sounds about right.

But I suppose delusional overconfidence is precisely the trait you’d want in a cryptocurrency trader. Unfortunately, it’s not such a great characteristic when it comes complying with tax law. Best of luck, morons.

[NYT]

Related articles

UBS Closer to Getting the McCarthy Treatment

IRS_logo-thumb-150x140.jpgIf you’ve got a Swiss bank account, here’s hoping you opened it because it was convenient for your monthly skiing/Toblerone getaway.
The U.S. and Swiss governments have agreed to share more tax information in order to crack down on all the tax dodgers out there that send their money offshore. The timing of this agreement is is especially diabolical because the IRS is currently trying to get Swiss bank behemoth UBS to name names of over 50,000 American clients.
Hearings in Miami are scheduled for next month to see if the names can be released, however, the Swiss have stated that this may violate Swiss law of double-secret-no-tattling-on-clients.
Ultimately, the Swiss Federal Council and Parliament will decide if the new agreement is kosh but judging by the Obama Administration’s hard-on for closing tax loopholes, they’ll probably play ball.

U.S. and Switzerland to Share More Tax Data
[DealBook/NYT]

BBC: Grant Thornton is Scheming for the Rich People

Grant-thornton-logo.JPGOkay, so large accounting firms don’t have the best reputations. They also have the tendency to be thick as thieves when they come under scrutiny. And the green eyeshade look has never been one that screams trustworthy.
But now, in what might be a bit of presumptuous awesomeness, the BBC is coming right out and calling Grant Thornton’s Growth Securities Ownership Plan (GSOP) a scheme. Maybe we’re jumping to conclusions but the subtitle doesn’t strike us as being subtle: “A big accountancy firm has denied that it has been peddling a tax avoidance scheme to help rich people avoid paying the new 50% income tax rate from 2010.
Let’s break some of the key words and phrases down:
Peddling: Use of this word basically implies that narcotics are involved
Tax Avoidance Scheme: Implies a conspiracy of smart people to screw the tax authority on behalf of…
Rich People: Not the best time in history to be lumped into this particular demographic
WTG, G to the T. Not only are you trying to screw the taxing authority in Britain by virtue of the equivalent of slinging financial smack, you’ve got the audacity to do it on the behalf of rich people.
Accountants deny ‘new tax dodge’ [BBC]