September 20, 2018

Accountant Goalie Scott Foster Attends NHL Awards Show, Is Funnier Than Jim Belushi

Golub Capital accountant Scott Foster, who has shunned the public spotlight since he helped lead the Chicago Blackhawks to a 6-2 win against the Winnipeg Jets on March 29 as an emergency backup goalie, came out of hiding last night to present an award during the NHL awards show in Las Vegas.

As someone who lives in the Chicago suburbs, I can tell you that Foster has achieved legendary status among Blackhawks fans like myself. Foster, who plays goalie in two recreational “beer leagues” in the Chicago area, was called into action in the third period of the game against Winnipeg after the Blackhawks’ starting and backup goalies left the game due to injuries.

Foster played the final 14 minutes and stopped all seven Jets shots he faced. He was named the No. 1 star of the game.

But other than a post-game interview with reporters, Foster has denied all other media requests, opting to concentrate on his real job as a senior financial accountant at Golub Capital, a position he has held for nearly two years.

But Foster appeared on stage with actor, comedian (I use that term loosely), and hated Chicago sports meatball Jim Belushi during the NHL awards show on June 20 to present the 2018 Vezina Trophy to the NHL’s best goalie.

Anyone—AND I MEAN ANYONE—is funnier than Jim Belushi, and it was pretty lame that he of all people shared the stage with Foster. I guess John Cusack and Vince Vaughn had better things to do. But Foster outshined the has-been actor during his brief time on stage:

From the Chicago Tribune:

“I’m excited to be here,” Foster said, “but I gotta make this quick.”

“Oh, yeah?” Belushi responded, squinting intently at the teleprompter. “I suppose now that you’re an NHL goalie you have to hit the gym and get ready for next season.”

“Nah,” Foster said. “Actually, I gotta get back to work.”

“Do you have any advice for any of these kids out there who dream of following in your footsteps?” Belushi asked.

“Yeah, I sure do,” Foster said. “First, I’d suggest a major in accounting with a master’s in accountancy.”

You can watch a video of Foster with the not-so-funnyman here.

[Chicago Tribune]

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Non-Profits Are Feeling the Pain

WSJ has a Monday piece “Once-Robust Charity Sector Hit With Mergers, Closings” (the Recession Forces Nonprofits to Consolidate) that may be found here. It tells the story of a “homeless” woman with terminal lung cancer and a charity no longer able to afford to help her out. Sad.

When one charity’s COO says “we’ve had funding cut after funding cut, and we never know when the next shoe is going to drop,” that is a bad sign.

Hit by a drop in donations and government funding in the wake of a deep recession, nonprofits—from arts councils to food banks—are undergoing a painful restructuring, including mergers, acquisitions, collaborations, cutbacks and closings.

“Like in the animal kingdom, at some point, the weaker organizations will not be able to survive,” says Diana Aviv, chief executive of Independent Sector, a coalition of 600 nonprofits.

I saw that on the Discovery Channel and it wasn’t pretty.

Note: the Service says the value of your blood is not deductible as a charitable donation but cars are. As of 2005, cars are only deductible at FMV, not Blue Book. Damn you, fair value, foiled by the free market again!

Blame the Service for tightening its charitable donation rules at the worst possible time? Not sure on that one. While you’re reluctant to donate your $200 Toyota (ha) to charity because you could have claimed $2,000 under old rules, find some comfort in the fact that (alleged) terrorist “non profits” can not file for 2 years and somehow get away with it. You wonder why I advocate fixing the system from the ground up?

You can text $10 to Haiti but what about the “Economic Homeless” here in America? asks Young Money.

If this were a survey and you asked me “What do you think the IRS could do to encourage charitable donations?” I would answer “Tax breaks. It isn’t the Treasury’s job to distribute bailouts.” Yet they continue to behave as though it is their duty.

See the problem yet?

Three Social Networking Tips for Accountants

Depending on where you’re working these days, you might already be or soon to be under snow. Why not put that much-needed day “working” from home to benefit your next career move? Here are three steps that you can take now to better your social networking profile to prepare for post-busy season.

Update your LinkedIn account – When was the last time you refreshed your LinkedIn account? Dig up the password, log in, and revamp your profile. Those 23 requests sitting dormant in your inbox? Accept them. Update your work experience. Include details about both the industries you work in and the responsibilities you’ve accrued. Remember, recruiters are constantly filtering through LinkedIn profiles looking for potential matches.

Also, make sure you upload a respectable picture. If it is something you wouldn’t want your client seeing, pass on it. But whatever you do, do not leave the picture option blank. Recruiters are much more inclined to review a potential match if the profile includes a picture. Worst case scenario – have your roommate, significant other, or spouse snap a photo one morning before you head to work (the post-work look of disgust should be avoided).


Be socially responsible – No, I’m not talking about going out and saving the whales. For those of you who are active on social networking sites, you need to be cognizant of the fact that you’re constantly creating an online footprint.

Facebook – Double check the settings in your Facebook account. Facebook is continuously altering these; oftentimes the new defaults leave your information wide open for the general public to see. Your Facebook profile — including status updates, wall posts, and photo albums — should be off limits to viewers who are not your Facebook friends. Speaking of photos, lose the keg stand picture from senior year. You wear a button-down shirt to work now.

Twitter – The email address on your resumé is most likely connected to your Twitter account. Block your tweets from the general public if you are discussing things you’d rather not share with a potential interviewer.

Dig up those old recruiter emails – You know the ones I’m talking about. They’re cold, robotic emails that tease you on random weekday afternoons. Typically they’re titled, “New Opportunities in hedge funds” but the more apt title is, “How to get the $*@! off your current engagement and home in time for dinner.”

Dig through your old emails and find some of these. Read through them. See what sparks your interest. At the very least, try to figure out what you want to do next, what qualifications you already have, and what you can do to prepare yourself for the next step. Your current engagement might be providing you an opportunity to expand your skill set; jump at that possibility.