July 17, 2018

These 10 Accounting and Finance Jobs Are Hot, Hot, Hot

So say the folks at recruiting firm CyberCoders, so plan your career accordingly:

In 2018, the CyberCoders data shows that the most in-demand accounting and finance position is financial advisor, with an average salary of $85,860, followed by loan officer at $68,000 and tax supervisor with an average salary of $96,944.

The job of financial advisor had a 12.8% growth increase, loan officer 11.7%, and tax supervisor 5.9%. Rounding out the top five are staff auditor and director of accounting, both at 5.4%.

CyberCoders put this list together after analyzing more than 400,000 data points from proprietary placement and jobs data from 2014-18.

Here is the full list, which includes job title, average annual salary, and % growth increase:

  1. Financial advisor, $85,860, 12.8%
  2. Loan officer, $68,000, 11.7%
  3. Tax supervisor, $96,944, 5.9%
  4. Staff auditor, $64,209, 5.4%
  5. Director of accounting, $129,606, 5.4%
  6. Underwriter, $84,297, 4.6%
  7. Accountant, $67,072, 3.8%
  8. Staff accountant, $58,427, 3.7%
  9. Mortgage processor, $54,541, 3.6%
  10. Accounting manager, $87,653, 3.4%

Direct endorsement underwriter was the top accounting job last fall, according to CyberCoders, followed by audit manager, audit senior, tax senior, and tax manager.

[CyberCoders]

Image: iStock/FuatKose

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Forbes: Senior Accountants Pay Rising in the Recession

Feel free to call bullshit on this because we’ve heard rumors about pay freezes at KPMG (they are getting back to us on this) but according to Forbes, senior accountants rank at #11 for “Hot Jobs Where Pay is Rising” in the recession. The list states median pay at $60,300. Not only that but apparently, there aren’t enough of you senior accountants:

There’s a shortage of senior accountants right now, and the recession has actually provided a chance for them to revive client relationships, believes Mark Koziel, senior manager of firm practice management at the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. “As long as there’s small-business America, as long as there’s big-business America, there will still be a need to do auditing and tax returns,” he says.

This strikes us as strange as there have been layoffs at several firms. The need for auditing and is obvious but those of you left are probably doing the work of two or three people.
UPDATE, July 22, 2009: KPMG got back to us re: pay freezes and had no comment