Study: Women Even Less Willing to Put Up With Crappy Pay Than Men

By | 1 year ago

Partners at accounting firms probably have a hunch about why women don't stick around, but that hunch is probably wrong:

A recent global ICEDR study revealed that leaders believe that the majority of women around the age of 30 leave because they are struggling to balance work and life or planning to have children, whereas men leave because of compensation. However, according to women themselves (and in sharp contrast to the perceptions of their leaders), the primary factor influencing their decision to leave their organizations is pay. In fact, women are actually more likely to leave because of compensation than men.

Also interesting is, "Four out of the five top reasons thirtysomething women and men leave organizations overlap," which suggests that your firm is repelling genders equally. That's…something? Adjust your plans (read: payscale) accordingly.

[HBR]

 

Tags