Accounting News Roundup: Corporate America's Deadliest Catch; 'We did a lot of erasing.'; Obama's Thénardier Impression | 02.27.13

CFO: Most Dangerous Job in Corporate America [CFO]
The commercial fisher(wo)men of the white collar world.

Why America’s Charities Are So Uncharitable [Slate]
All you need is a stamp, $400, and to fill out some forms. A charitable purpose? Not really.

The Home Office in the Spotlight [WSJ]
The outcry surrounding a decision by Yahoo Inc.—led by new Chief Executive Marissa Mayer—to end work-from-home arrangements has shown just how strongly many companies and employees have embraced remote work, but it also underscores tensions between workers' need for flexibility and their need for visibility. Companies tout working from home as a benefit that helps recruit and retain talent over the long term, but workers may be missing out on the personal contacts that get them promoted. Clichés about the water-cooler aside, many managers say having workers in the office makes sense, given greater emphasis on collaboration and group projects. And despite studies showing that home-based workers may be more productive than their cubicle-bound peers, remote workers must also combat the perceptions among managers and colleagues that they're not spending the day goofing off.

Woman found guilty of lying to IRS agents investigating boss [LVRJ]
A boss accused of a $190 million Ponzi scheme. 

Veteran accountant Jerry Miller evolves with time, technology [TSR]
Wanting to murder an annoying client 30 years ago was much more justifiable: "When I first started, we used to prepare tax returns by hand. And we always did them in pencil, because often we’d get toward the end and the client would bring in another piece of information that would change three or four different numbers. We did a lot of erasing."

2012 Tax Journal Rankings: Virginia #1, NYU #2 [TaxProf]
Elder Law Journal, Florida Tax Review, and Tax Notes round out your top five.

New agenda process seeks transparency for FASB, GASB [JofA
Plus, a committee of overlords will set the agendas, rather than one all-powerful debit-and-credit master.

Internet Gambling Scores Its Biggest Win [WSJ]
New Jersey on Tuesday became the biggest state yet to allow regulated online gambling, establishing a template that proponents hope other states will follow for a business that federal authorities long treated as a criminal enterprise. The new law allows Atlantic City's casinos to run websites that take bets on games such as blackjack, slots and poker. It also could help legitimize online-gambling companies whose executives the U.S. Justice Department once targeted for offering the same kind of Internet wagers.

Hoarders, wreckers and the Accumulated Earnings Tax [Tax Update]
Interesting news for über-tax wonks.

Estate Taxes After ATRA [TPC]
And now something for the estate planning folk.

Taxing the Rich, Thenardier-Style [Jeremy Scott]
President Obama seems to be taking tax policy advice from the musical’s comical antagonist, Thenardier. Just like Thenardier hides the true cost of his services from customers by using surcharges and hidden fees, Obama would like to raise taxes on the rich by doing everything but attacking the problem head-on.

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