Accounting News Roundup: GM Still Lacks Effective Internal Control System; The Ten Highest State Income Tax Rates; How to Know When Your Boss Is Lying | 08.20.10

GM filing warns on reporting [Detroit Free Press]
This may come as a shock but General Motors, despite filing paperwork for its IPO, admits that they still don't have effective internal controls.

"[I]n regulatory filings about its upcoming initial public offering, GM warned potential investors that 'our internal controls of financial reporting are currently not effective.'

Experts are divided on whether the warning -- one of about 30 risk factors identified by GM in a document describing a planned sale of shares -- is just an obscure accounting matter or a red flag that taints GM's financial reporting

The 10 Highest State Income Tax Rates For 2010 [Forbes]
If you're single and make $200k or $400k and married in Hawaii, you get dinged for 11%, the highest ranking state on the list. Dark horse Iowa comes in at #5 gets 8.98% of taxable income over $64,261. That's above New Jersey and New York tied at #6.

Transocean accuses BP of withholding data on Deepwater Horizon and oil spill [WaPo]
Just when you thought the ugliness was slowing down (at least in the media coverage), " Even as they work together to kill the Macondo well in the Gulf of Mexico, the oil giant BP and the deep-water drilling rig company Transocean are in an increasingly bitter battle over what went wrong on April 20 to trigger America's worst oil spill.

The conflict flared Thursday when Transocean fired off a scathing letter accusing BP of hoarding information and test results related to the Deepwater Horizon blowout that killed 11 people, including nine Transocean employees. Signed by Transocean's acting co-general counsel, Steven L. Roberts, the letter says that Transocean's internal investigation of what went wrong has been hampered by BP's refusal to deliver 'even the most basic information' about the event.

'[I]t appears that BP is withholding evidence in an attempt to prevent any entity other than BP from investigating the cause of the April 20th incident and the resulting spill,' the letter states, and it demands a long list of technical documents and lab tests."

How to tell when your boss is lying [The Economist]
Apparently cursing is a good sign.

Koss reports smaller quarterly loss on 14% sales decline [Milwaukee Journal Sentinel]
The company lost $423,450 for the six months ended June 30th. They spent $1.12 million on legal fees related to Suzy Sachdeva.

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